Blog Archives

An ‘L’ of a way with grid references

Nav voucher

Despite the big changes in approaches to teaching navigation over the last decade or so, grid references will need to be introduced and used at some point to allow progression. As with a lot of the skills required for using

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Posted in Mountain Training, Navigation, Trips

The pitfalls of left and right in navigation and route description

Sedimentary rocks

We’ve all had the experience of mixing up left and right, often when trying to explain a route to a driver when we’re feeling under pressure ourselves. Confusing left and right may have been a contributing factor to the rout

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Posted in Hill Running, Mountain Training, Navigation, Orienteering

Completed British Orienteering Event Safety and Introduction to Orienteering e-learning

During the long days of lockdown, I found myself starting to do a lot of work for an organization where we were looking at Open Orienteering Maps and MapRunF as adjuncts to outdoor learning. This led to a gradual reconnection

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Posted in Edinburgh, Navigation, Orienteering

The evidence of craggers not seen

Under lockdown, I’ve followed my renewed interest in climbing outdoors by visiting my local crags in southern Edinburgh. We are exceptionally lucky, as Blackford Hill contains two cragging sites, as well as the bouldering problems associated with Agassiz Rock. Even

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Posted in Climbing, Edinburgh, Geodiversity

Edgelands in North Lanarkshire

Edgelands are those places that are on the periphery of urban sites. The concept was wonderfully explored in a book of the same name by Paul Farley & Michael Symonns Roberts and has become a pervasive enough concept to warrant

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Posted in Geodiversity, Scotland, Woodlands

An unexpected Pavement Palaeontology bonanza at Straiton retail park

Earlier in the week I was out checking out another prospect for work, as expedition trips are few and far between just now, when I stumbled upon the stone cladding used on the Next Store. I don’t have any call

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Posted in Geodiversity, Palaeonotology, Scotland

Lochan nan Arm: legends, translations and a bit of geomorphology

Stone bench

I’ve quite a long association with the area around Tyndrum in the Western Highlands. I first visited as part of one of my undergraduate projects when I was doing my geology degree related to past mining activity and then went

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Posted in Geodiversity, Scotland, Trips

Thanks to Celox Training Academy for ‘Principles of Haemorrhage Control’ CPD course

In the last decade, a number of organizations and campaigns (e.g. Stop the Bleed, citizenAID) have begun to promote the need to prevent people bleeding to death from severe external injuries that could be treated by first-aiders. Keeping up with

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Posted in Mountain Training, Outdoor first-aid

‘Footwear systems’ for the hills

Shoe and improvised gaiter

One important piece of advice I was given by my old friend Dr Andy McMullen (Botanaeco) when I started doing a lot of outdoor work, both leadership and scientific fieldwork, in 2014 was to LOOK AFTER MY FEET! Part of

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Posted in Hill Running, Mountain Training, Orienteering, Scotland, Uncategorized

Hills of Hame: ready to go outdoors if you are

Hills of Hame works across Scotland on a range of activities and skills but fundamentally the company exists to help people, either as individuals or groups, move towards being able to undertake activities they would like to do. Al’s ideal

Posted in Uncategorized
Al is a Hill and Moorland Leader and has also completed the Expedition Skills module
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