Blog Archives

The evidence of craggers not seen

Under lockdown, I’ve followed my renewed interest in climbing outdoors by visiting my local crags in southern Edinburgh. We are exceptionally lucky, as Blackford Hill contains two cragging sites, as well as the bouldering problems associated with Agassiz Rock. Even

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Posted in Climbing, Edinburgh, Geodiversity

Edgelands in North Lanarkshire

Edgelands are those places that are on the periphery of urban sites. The concept was wonderfully explored in a book of the same name by Paul Farley & Michael Symonns Roberts and has become a pervasive enough concept to warrant

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Posted in Geodiversity, Scotland, Woodlands

An unexpected Pavement Palaeontology bonanza at Straiton retail park

Earlier in the week I was out checking out another prospect for work, as expedition trips are few and far between just now, when I stumbled upon the stone cladding used on the Next Store. I don’t have any call

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Posted in Geodiversity, Palaeonotology, Scotland

Lochan nan Arm: legends, translations and a bit of geomorphology

Stone bench

I’ve quite a long association with the area around Tyndrum in the Western Highlands. I first visited as part of one of my undergraduate projects when I was doing my geology degree related to past mining activity and then went

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Posted in Geodiversity, Scotland, Trips

Fossil plants in the Fossil Courtyard for Fossil Friday

That’s a lot of fossils in a title! I’ve decided to do a short blog post on the Fossil Courtyard in the Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh (RBGE), one of the network of national botanic gardens in Scotland. The Fossil Courtyard

Posted in Edinburgh, Geodiversity, Palaeonotology, Scotland

Contributing to ‘Exploring the Environment’ MTA/AMI workshop, Stirling, April 20th 1000-1600

With the help of a number of other MTA and AMI members, I’ll be helping out at a CPD workshop for outdoor leaders who are members of the two Associations in the Stirling and Bridge of Allan area. I’ll be

Posted in Geodiversity, Mountain Training, Scotland, Woodlands

Do try this at home: Taphonomy with the kids’ toys

Another dinosaur excavation kit, accompanied by a fine selection of supporting materials, appeared in the house among the Christmas presents. The block with the plastic remains of the inevitable T. rex was larger than usual. And that made all the difference

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Posted in Geodiversity, Palaeonotology

Bavelaw

Wintery conditions have finally arrived in the lower hills in the Central Belt of Scotland. In the Pentlands the snow is lying but azure polar skies and mists as the sun gains strength afforded some spectacular views today while I

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Posted in Geodiversity, Pentlands

Snakestone specimen in the Cockburn

Dactilyoceras commune is a Lower Jurassic ammonoid often found in the sea cliffs of the Yorkshire Coast. Around Whitby they are common enough to feature on the coat of arms of the town in triplicate. However, these ammonoids have heads

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Posted in Geodiversity

Kirriemuir: geo and munro

While roaming the Mearns with the kids we went to Kirriemuir on our travels. I’ve been through Kirrie a few times but had not noticed the links to two of my areas of interest. The square has several plaques to

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Posted in Geodiversity, Geological Walks (urban), Scotland, Trips
Al is a Hill and Moorland Leader and has also completed the Expedition Skills module
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