Blog Archives

Urban Geology meets Urban Nature Maps

Man, boy and dog looking at a map on a wooden floor

Edinburgh is a great city to be a geologist in. So much rock is exposed within the city bounds and there is a considerable variety in lithology, if not geological age. While the commanding heights of the seven hills (Arthur’s

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Posted in Book reviews, Edinburgh, Geodiversity, Geological Walks (urban), Maps, Scotland, Woodlands

Cycle Training Assistant completed through Cycling Scotland

Over the past two weekends I continued my progress in building up my cycling qualifications through Cycling Scotland. Local difficulties prevented me from getting up to do my final day on Cycle Trainer course with a fantastic group with diverse

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Posted in Cycling and bikes, Scotland

Edgelands in North Lanarkshire

Edgelands are those places that are on the periphery of urban sites. The concept was wonderfully explored in a book of the same name by Paul Farley & Michael Symonns Roberts and has become a pervasive enough concept to warrant

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Posted in Geodiversity, Scotland, Woodlands

An unexpected Pavement Palaeontology bonanza at Straiton retail park

Earlier in the week I was out checking out another prospect for work, as expedition trips are few and far between just now, when I stumbled upon the stone cladding used on the Next Store. I don’t have any call

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Posted in Geodiversity, Palaeonotology, Scotland

Lochan nan Arm: legends, translations and a bit of geomorphology

Stone bench

I’ve quite a long association with the area around Tyndrum in the Western Highlands. I first visited as part of one of my undergraduate projects when I was doing my geology degree related to past mining activity and then went

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Posted in Geodiversity, Scotland, Trips

‘Footwear systems’ for the hills

Shoe and improvised gaiter

One important piece of advice I was given by my old friend Dr Andy McMullen (Botanaeco) when I started doing a lot of outdoor work, both leadership and scientific fieldwork, in 2014 was to LOOK AFTER MY FEET! Part of

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Posted in Hill Running, Mountain Training, Orienteering, Scotland, Uncategorized

Beinn a’ Ghlo: back to the hills

Carn nan Gobhar

While it was possible to return to the Scottish hills for paid work a few days earlier, the 3rd of July saw the lifting of the five-mile travel restriction in Scotland. Although this gave me a lot of scope in

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Posted in Mountain Training, Mountains, Pathwork, Scotland

Hills of Hame is now ‘Good to Go’ after July 15th

Everyone in the outdoor community is having to adapt to changes and think about how deliver training and experiences under new constraints. Today I drew up a Covid-19 plan and worked through the Visit Scotland ‘Good to Go!’ accreditation scheme.

Posted in Edinburgh, Geological Walks, Geological Walks (urban), Pentlands, Scotland, Uncategorized

Keeping hill fit close to home

Although things have changed slightly in Scotland, with unlimited outdoor exercise, I’ve still been relying on a lot of home-based exercise to try to keep myself fit for getting back into the hills. I am lucky that there are small

Posted in Edinburgh, Hill Running, Mountain Training, Orienteering, Scotland, Woodlands

A lost soundscape revisited this morning

Shadow the dog and I were out to the west of Liberton Brae this morning. As we threaded our way out through the converted farm building of Liberton Tower Mains and stopped to watch a hovering kestrel, the lack of

Posted in Scotland, Trips, Uncategorized
Al is a Hill and Moorland Leader and has also completed the Expedition Skills module
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